April 20, 2018

Kenyan ER nurses in Australia celebrate Australian multiculturalism

Westmead ED harmony day Kenyan staff. Left to right: Andear Labtt (Reg nurse),Christine Njuguna (Reg nurse), Emily Sanchez (Reg nurse SURNAME NOTO BE DISCLOSED), Monica John (Reg nurse), Charles Njoroge (Reg nurse) PHOTO CREDIT: thepulse.org.au.

Kenyan nurses in Westmead Hospital’s emergency department in Australia yesterday joined the Australian community in celebrating the Harmony day.

Dressed in Kenyan cultural attire, the registered nurses celebrated the diverse cultural backgrounds represented by staff from the hospital.

“Today’s event has been great, everyone is so supportive in our department – you never feel isolated,” said one nurse.

Australia celebrates cultural diversity annually on Harmony Day which happens on March 21.

Staff at the hospital said the event was one of its kind in their department.

“We should definitely organize more events like this because it makes everyone feel like they’re part of the Australian community, ” said another ED (emergency department) nurse as reported by The Pulse

”Events like today’s make everyone feel included.” ED nurse Andear Labtt said

The nurses presented Kenyan and South Sudanese dishes and enjoyed some Kenyan music and dance moves.

Harmony Day is a day to celebrate Australian multiculturalism, based on the successful integration of migrants into the Australian community.

Australia’s diverse migrant communities have brought with them food, lifestyle and cultural practices, which have been absorbed into mainstream Australian culture.

”Harmony Day is about inclusiveness, respect and belonging for all Australians, regardless of cultural or linguistic background, united by a set of core Australian values” reads a statement on  Australia’s government website.

Harmony Day events have been held in childcare centers, schools, hospitals, community groups, churches, businesses and federal, state and local government agencies across Australia in the past.

Many Kenyans and Africans in general living abroad have joined the healthcare industry, with most of them opting for nursing.

Emergency room (ER) or emergency department (ED) nurses deal with one of the most fast-paced settings in a hospital, helping staff prioritize care based on the critical nature and severity of a patient’s condition and requires quick thinking, and extra attention to detail.

Westmead ED harmony day Kenyan staff. Left to right: Andear Labtt (Reg nurse), Dr Kit Rowe (medical officer), Emily Sanchez (Reg nurse SURNAME NOTO BE DISCLOSED), Megan Greg (Nurse practitioner), Dr Kavita Varshney (Staff specialist), Bonny Makoni (Clinical nurse consultant), Christine Njuguna (Reg nurse), Monica John (Reg nurse), Charles Njoroge (Reg nurse). PHOTO CREDIT: thepulse.org.au.

 

Westmead ED harmony day Kenyan staff. Left to right: Andear Labtt (Reg nurse),Christine Njuguna (Reg nurse), Emily Sanchez (Reg nurse SURNAME NOTO BE DISCLOSED), Monica John (Reg nurse), Charles Njoroge (Reg nurse). PHOTO CREDIT: thepulse.org.au.

 

Westmead ED harmony day Kenyan staff. Left to right: Dr Danielle Unwin (Staff specialist), Christine Njuguna (Reg nurse), Andear Labtt (Reg nurse), Emily Sanchez (Reg nurse dancing in the middle- SURNAME NOTO TO BE DISCLOSED), Monica John (Reg nurse), Charles Njoroge (Reg nurse). PHOTO CREDIT: thepulse.org.au.
Video courtesy: Western Sydney Health

 

 

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